Download PDF Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture book. Happy reading Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture Pocket Guide.

Log out of ReadCube.

Karen Cox - Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture

Volume 74 , Issue 4. The full text of this article hosted at iucr. If you do not receive an email within 10 minutes, your email address may not be registered, and you may need to create a new Wiley Online Library account. If the address matches an existing account you will receive an email with instructions to retrieve your username.

Book Review.

Confederacy Theory

Jodi Skipper University of Mississippi Search for more papers by this author. Tools Request permission Export citation Add to favorites Track citation. Share Give access Share full text access.

Search form

Share full text access. Please review our Terms and Conditions of Use and check box below to share full-text version of article.

Get access to the full version of this article. View access options below. That is to say that pastoral images and themes of the Old South and of southerners were used to sell goods and entertainment to American consumers, all of which was made possible by the modern urban-industrial world in which they lived. This was not lost on the producers of popular culture.

Ralph, who also reported for the New York Sun , traveled south via steamboat down the Mississippi River. He wrote fondly about his adventure as an escape from the frenetic North, pronouncing the South to be a place where he could "cast [his] lines off from the general world of today to float back into a past era, there to loaf away a week of utter rest, undisturbed by telegraph or telephone, a hotel elevator or a clanging cable-car, surrounded by comfort, fed from a good and generous kitchen, and at liberty to forget the rush and bustle of that raging monster the French call the fin de siecle.

And it was in the South, the least modernized region of the country, where he and others found comfort.

Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture

Historians, too, have written about the impact of modernity on American society. Robert Wiebe, in his now-classic work The Search for Order , described America at the turn of the twentieth century as a distended society in which people felt dislocation and bewilderment. In the midst of rapid industrialization and urbanization, especially in the North and the Midwest, Americans were obsessed with what Wiebe described as the peculiar ethical value of an agricultural life, which Americans had long taken for granted.

Jackson Lears, likewise, sought to understand this end-of-the-century anxiety in his book No Place of Grace , about antimodernism and the transformation of American culture. The response to these feelings, Lears argued, was that people yearn[ed] for an authentic experience, whether it was physical, spiritual, or emotional.


  • Earth Fire (The Cross-Worlds Coven Series Book 2);
  • Join Kobo & start eReading today.
  • Mettere Le Cose In Prospettiva?
  • Steel Sleet (BlaqJaq and Nickerson Book 1);
  • Read More From Karen L. Cox?
  • Karen Cox discusses Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture?

Although the language Lears used differed from that of Wiebe, they both recognized that a key component to understanding the rapid social and economic changes occurring at the turn of the twentieth century was the inherent contradiction between wanting the benefits of modernity while at the same time longing for the pastoral ideal. As Americans became consumers on a mass scale, they also consumed ideas about the products they purchased. When those products were marketed using southern imagery very often it was the South of the American imagination.

[Dreaming of Dixie] | kingseplaurego.tk

Advertising, movies, early radio, popular literature, and even music all worked in tandem to shape national perceptions of the South. It was represented as a region that upheld its links to the rural past and the one least spoiled by urbanization. This action might not be possible to undo. Are you sure you want to continue? Upload Sign In Join. Home Books Society. Save For Later. Create a List. Summary From the late nineteenth century through World War II, popular culture portrayed the American South as a region ensconced in its antebellum past, draped in moonlight and magnolias, and represented by such southern icons as the mammy, the belle, the chivalrous planter, white-columned mansions, and even bolls of cotton.

Read on the Scribd mobile app Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN cloth : alk. Southern States—In popular culture—History. Nostalgia— Southern States. Romanticism—Southern States. Popular culture—United States—History. The Culture of Reconciliation Sectional reconciliation following the Civil War was by no means limited to reunions of veterans, nor was it simply a matter of politics.

Start your free 30 days. Page 1 of 1. Close Dialog Are you sure? Also remove everything in this list from your library. Are you sure you want to delete this list? Remove them from Saved? No Yes. Explore now. Want to improve your brain power? BrainHQ has 29 online exercises that work out attention, brain speed, memory, people skills, navigation, and intelligence.

From the late nineteenth century through World War II, popular culture portrayed the American South as a region ensconced in its antebellum past, draped in moonlight and magnolias, and represented by such southern icons as the mammy, the belle, the chivalrous planter, white-columned mansions, and even bolls of cotton.

But what if this constructed nostalgia for the Old South was actually manufactured by outsiders?

Citation Manager Formats

On Tuesday, August 30, , at p. Cox , associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, shows that the chief purveyors of the Dixieland dream were largely non-southerners — advertising copywriters, musicians, publishers, radio personalities, writers, and filmmakers — who found profit in playing to consumers' anxiety about modernity by marketing the South as a region still dedicated to America's pastoral — and racially segregated — traditions.

In her presentation, Cox, author of the newly-released Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture , also examines how southerners themselves embraced the imaginary romance of the region's past, particularly in the tourist trade as southern states and cities sought to capitalize on popular perceptions by showcasing their Old South heritage. Only when television emerged as the most influential medium of popular culture did views of the South begin to change, as news coverage of the civil rights movement brought images of violence, protest, and conflict in the South into people's living rooms.

Until then, Cox argues, most Americans remained content with their romantic vision of Dixie.


  1. ‎Dreaming of Dixie on Apple Books.
  2. When I Have Alzheimer’s.
  3. Schaffer on Cox, 'Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture'!
  4. A Relíquia (Portuguese Edition)?
  5. Document Preview!
  6. Admission to the event is free. RSVP online or call